The Truth Is…

By Kristen

…this profession is hard. You will have to sacrifice time with your family, miss special occasions and give up the notion that you will have a “normal” life. However, you will feel tremendous satisfaction in being a part of something bigger than yourself, being able to help one person at a time with the worst day of their lives. Even if it only happens once in a shift, it is worth all the things you have had to give up.

 
…not everyone is going to understand what role you play in this industry. You are the “voice” of the organization. You solidify efforts made with community outreach; how you respond will make or break that tenuous relationship. You influence the relationship between your officers and the public. Be secure in the knowledge, even if you are the only one who knows it, you make this industry what it is…compassionate, professional, effective.

…we are witness to some horrific moments in people’s lives. We also bear witness to some amazing moments; births, rescues, people confronting their demons and who are victorious. We can be proud to say that we were there when someone needed us. They will never know us, but we know them and a small part of their story. We share in their lives, and that is a privilege.

…this is one of the most rewarding professions one can hope to be a part of. We work hard to get here and a lot of time and effort is put into getting us fully trained up. Some people make it and some people don’t. Not everyone is built to handle the stressors of shift work, operations, and (of course) working with the callers and officers, everyday, sometimes for 16 hours with little break. But then we get that one call from a woman who has been beat up again by her boyfriend, or the call from a man who is about to become a Dad for the first time, or (and heaven save us all) from the officer in trouble and all the pieces fall into place and everyone goes home safe and sound. We can thank all of that training, hard work, and sometimes tears, for being there and making it a good outcome.

…I wouldn’t trade this life for any other.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s